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Highway 63 Bridge Replacement Project

 

 


The Eisenhower Bridge crosses the Mississippi River main channel at Red Wing, MN. It has provided an essential link between Minnesota and Wisconsin and has seen much use since it's inauguration in 1960.  However, time has taken it's toll and the bridge must now be replaced.  The Minnesota Department of Transportation has begun work on the project and anticipates work to be complete in August of 2020.



Two local philanthropic organizations have teamed up enhance the aesthetics of the new Red Wing bridge. The Red Wing Area Fund and the Jones Family Foundation have generously contributed a total of $364,920 in beautification projects which will help make the new bridge as pleasing to the eye as it is functional.  The Area Fund -Jones Foundation grant will cover the following:

  • Special lighting, called “wash lighting,” will outline the bridge shape on the upstream side and be visible from Levee Park, the river itself, and the Wisconsin shore.
  • Landscaping of the interior of the circular intersection connecting traffic on Highways 63 and 61 which is called the “buttonhook.” This will greatly enhance this gateway feature.
  • A sizable sign, probably adjacent to Barn Bluff, welcoming Minnesota bound motorists to Red Wing.

These contributions will complement the City’s aesthetic contributions of:  Architectural texture and coloring of concrete elements, ornamental railings and barriers, pedestrian overlooks with decorative lighting, spires and pilasters, downtown decorative lighting and decorative banner poles. Additionally, the Departments of Transportation of Minnesota and Wisconsin will be providing aesthetic items costing some $1.8 million and $450,000, respectively.

Contact Us:
Jay Owens
City of Red Wing City Engineer/Project Manager
Jay.owens@ci.red-wing.mn.us
651-385-3625

 

Fast Fact Image

The 3-story building known as the Wagon Works was built in the 1860's; over the years the Wagon Works building was home to a number of uses and most recently had fallen into a state of disrepair. The City wondered if the building was beyond repair. The community worked with Knudsen's Caramels & Cheesecake to acquire and finance a top to bottom renovation of the Wagon Works building, which now serves as an example of just how one might take a building from a total state of disrepair to a community treasure. Today, the caramel business is stronger than ever and Knudsen Caramels are distributed nationwide.